Mekong Review vol. 6 no. 1

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Just when it seems that Mekong Review has breathed its last – and that’s been the case quite a lot in recent months – then Minh Bui Jones produces a small kind of miracle. We took the entire print run of the latest issue today, as it enters its sixth year of production (now that’s a real miracle) and we’re helping to get it distributed in these difficult times. As you’d expect, there’s an excellent range of articles, reviews, profiles, journals, poetry, travelogue, a short story and more. Here are some highlights.

 

➭ The lead review is Chris Baker’s perceptive assessment of Duncan McCargo and Anyarat Chattharakul’s Future Forward: The Rise and Fall of a Thai Political Party (NIAS Press) which offers a vantage point for understand the current political protests in Thailand.

➭ As you’d expect, there’s also a Hong Kong theme with Antony Dapiran’s review of Michael Davis’s new book on the rollback of human rights there.

➭ There’s also a lot of in-depth coverage of China: a double review by Robert Templer of two books on China’s environmental and health crises, while Michael Riley examines Michael Cole’s account of recent China–Taiwan relations. Yuan Zhu takes stock of Bill Hayton’s latest, The Invention of China.

➭ The magazine has spread its remit in recent issues, and it’s good to see a very thoughtful piece by Sudhir Thomas Vadaketh on a similar topic, this time ‘the invention of India’.

➭ Poetry has always been well covered in Mekong Review, thanks largely to the brilliant reviews of Michael Freeman – this time reviewing Cyril Wong’s Infinity Diary.

➭ Michael Vatikiotis provides a punchy interview with the ever-provocative Singaporean diplomat and public intellectual Kishore Mahbubani.

➭ One of the very best pieces is a vital reflection by Su Lin Lewis on the significance of the Black Lives Matter movement and the historical commonalities in the struggles of African, African American and Asian peoples.

➭ Finally, our friend Marc de Faoite has written a profile of the bookshop – a ‘Penang retreat’ – with thoughts on bookselling in a time of the coronavirus.

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Description

Just when it seems that Mekong Review has breathed its last – and that’s been the case quite a lot in recent months – then Minh Bui Jones produces a small kind of miracle. We took the entire print run of the latest issue today, as it enters its sixth year of production (now that’s a real miracle) and we’re helping to get it distributed in these difficult times. As you’d expect, there’s an excellent range of articles, reviews, profiles, journals, poetry, travelogue, a short story and more. Here are some highlights.

 

➭ The lead review is Chris Baker’s perceptive assessment of Duncan McCargo and Anyarat Chattharakul’s Future Forward: The Rise and Fall of a Thai Political Party (NIAS Press) which offers a vantage point for understand the current political protests in Thailand.

➭ As you’d expect, there’s also a Hong Kong theme with Antony Dapiran’s review of Michael Davis’s new book on the rollback of human rights there.

➭ There’s also a lot of in-depth coverage of China: a double review by Robert Templer of two books on China’s environmental and health crises, while Michael Riley examines Michael Cole’s account of recent China–Taiwan relations. Yuan Zhu takes stock of Bill Hayton’s latest, The Invention of China.

➭ The magazine has spread its remit in recent issues, and it’s good to see a very thoughtful piece by Sudhir Thomas Vadaketh on a similar topic, this time ‘the invention of India’.

➭ Poetry has always been well covered in Mekong Review, thanks largely to the brilliant reviews of Michael Freeman – this time reviewing Cyril Wong’s Infinity Diary.

➭ Michael Vatikiotis provides a punchy interview with the ever-provocative Singaporean diplomat and public intellectual Kishore Mahbubani.

➭ One of the very best pieces is a vital reflection by Su Lin Lewis on the significance of the Black Lives Matter movement and the historical commonalities in the struggles of African, African American and Asian peoples.

➭ Finally, our friend Marc de Faoite has written a profile of the bookshop – a ‘Penang retreat’ – with thoughts on bookselling in a time of the coronavirus.

 

Publisher: Mekong Review

Magazine

2020

ISBN: 9772016122803